Find Answers, Work Together, and Write Your History: New Expert Series Articles

by Amy Johnson Crow

Posted on July 23, 2013

If you're looking for new ways to find out more about your family history - and who isn't?! - the recent Archives.com Expert Series articles are a great place to start. You'll learn about yearbooks, researching in Tennessee, working together, and other things that will help you discover your heritage. Let's take a closer look.

Genealogy is sometimes thought of as a solitary pursuit, but it doesn't have to be. Jennifer Holik knows about the power of working together. Read her article "Collaborate on Family History and Watch What Happens" and be inspired to reach out to others who share your research interests.

Yearbooks can be a great way to interest the youngsters in the family into learning more about their family tree. (There's something about seeing Grandpa with hair that gets them hooked!) Lisa Alzo shows us all about this fun resource in "Using Yearbooks to Learn About Your Ancestors."

Do you have ancestors from Tennessee? If so, you will want to read J. Mark Lowe's very informative article "Beginning to Research Your Ancestors in Tennessee." Learn some great tips and tricks for researching in the Volunteer State.

Need to know how much $20 in 1910 would be worth in today's dollars? What was the weather in Detroit on August 23, 1940? Why did the chicken cross the road? Learn how to find the answer in Thomas MacEntee's article "WolframAlpha: A New Tool for Genealogy." It's a whole new kind of search engine.

You've heard the advice to write your family story. You know you should, but it feels like a daunting task. Sunny McClellan Morton understands. Read her article "Publish Your Family History Without Being Overwhelmed" and relax. You can do it!

About the Expert Series

The Expert Series is a collection of articles from top genealogists around the country. The articles are aimed to help beginning and advanced family history enthusiasts alike solve common research problems, break-through brick walls, and learn how to improve their research techniques. Visit www.archives.com/experts/ to learn more.

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